Tag Archives: Skip Schumaker

2012 Preview: Second Base

Second base looks to be one of the more interesting positions in 2012. The perceived incumbent, Skip Schumaker, is looking at more of a utility role than in years past while both Daniel Descalso and Tyler Greene have been mentioned as potential starters by Cardinals’ GM John Mozeliak. It certainly looks to be the only real positional battle for the Cards entering spring training and it will be one that will have clearly defined battle lines.

Greene, 28, is one of the most polarizing young Cardinals. In fact, a few of us bloggers were discussing him on Twitter today. A few thinking he is the breakout Cardinal of the year while myself and a couple others still question just what type of player he is.

A former first round pick, most of the interest in Greene has been created by the numbers he’s put up the last three years in the minor leagues. What happened three years ago, he turned 25, the age where you start taking the “prospect” tag away from a minor league player. If he hasn’t shown up by then, will he ever? Going into the 2009 season, Greene’s career line in the minor leagues was a paltry .254/.323/.414. His defense is below average at what people would call his “natural position,” short stop.
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Motte, Cardinals avoid arbitration

Minutes ago CBS’ Jon Heyman reported that Jason Motte and the St. Louis Cardinals have avoided arbitration. Motte, 29, has agreed to a $1.95 million contract for the 2012 season. The contract also contains $75,000 worth of performance incentives.

Motte, the Cardinals’ 19th round pick of the 2003 draft, was in his first arbitration year and was the team’s final case. Last year, Kyle McClellan got $1.375 million from the Cardinals for a very similar season as a go-to arm in the bullpen. However, Motte was the team’s closer during a phenomenal September run into the playoffs and the franchise’s 11th World Series Championship. Something that would obviously increase his value.

In 68 innings last year, Motte made 78 appearances and posted a 2.25 ERA. He also allowed fewer than 1 baserunner per inning with his 0.956 WHIP. He also had a 27 inning scoreless streak reaching from June 23rd against Philadelphia to September 6th against Milwaukee.

This means that all the Cardinals’ arbitration cases have been decided. Infielder Ryan Theriot was not offered a contract at the deadline, Skip Schumaker was signed a 2 year extension, Kyle McClellan agreed to terms with the Cardinals last week, and now Motte. The team should now be ready for Spring Training, which begins on February 18th when Pitchers & Catchers report. That’s 24 days.

Edit: It has now been confirmed with a tweet from the Cardinals official account.

UCB Roundtable

I asked my question earlier this week and should have posted it Tuesday, but I was busy trying to wrap up the necessary work I needed to do in order to make sure I can walk in graduation on Sunday. It’s been a long 8 and a half years trying to cram four years of school work into it. Finally almost ready to call it complete.

If you’re wondering what the UCB Roundtable is, it’s when us UCB writers kick around a question via our Google Group for a day. Each day a different writer poses the question and the rest of us answer and discuss it. It’s been going on for quite some time, if you want to see the cumulative post on the UCB site, here it is.

Anyway, my question for the day was: If you are the Cardinals’ GM, considering where we’re at financially and strategically, what free agent would you pursue to add to the team and why?

Here’s how it went.

Daniel Shoptaw, C70 at the Bat:

The more I read about it, the more Carlos Beltran just makes sense, at least on a limited contract. Not sure if he’d do a one-year deal or not, but that’d be ideal. Beltran can (at least in theory) play center and also right, covers us while Allen Craig is out plus gives us some insurance in case Jon Jay slumps. His bat was stronger in the second half than in the first last year as he continued to get healthy. Switch-hitting helps the flexibility and it makes for fewer decisions for Mike Matheny. All in all, it seems like a perfect fit to me.

Daniel Solzman, Redbird Rants:

At the current moment, I would go after Carlos Beltran but not for a long term deal. At his age, I would ask if he would even be willing to play right field even if he would prefer CF. At the same time, I would want to figure out a way to keep Allen Craig’s bat in the lineup once he fully recovers.

I’m assuming Skip Schumaker comes back and likely plays almost every day at second base.

I know Rob Rains brought up the idea of Derrick Lee to play first but that makes no sense as we would be platooning someone in the OF, which I thought was the reason as to why Rasmus was traded (along with his attitude).

Don’t get me wrong though… I’d love to see Rick Ankiel or Ryan Ludwick back but at the right price.

Ray DeRousse, Stlcardinalbaseball.com:

If I’m the GM, the only big thing we pursue is a lefthanded reliever, which we’d obtain through a trade given the dearth of lefties on the market.

The only other deal I’d like to make is nabbing Ryan Ludwick on the cheap to shore up our outfield depth and platoon with Jon Jay.

Mark Tomasik, Retrosimba.com:

I’ve pursue the best available left-handed reliever and best available starting pitcher. Cardinals need a proven left-handed reliever who is effective against left-handed batters in late-inning situations. I believe Cardinals need more starting pitching in case of an injury to one of the five in the rotation or in case a Kyle Lohse or Jake Westbrook is ineffective.

Bill Ivie, I-70 Baseball:

We’ve been discussing a bit on Twitter this morning and i will say, four names jump out at me:

Nate McLouth
Ryan Ludwick
Rick Ankiel
Carlos Beltran

I believe this team would be best served by adding a sure outfielder on a short term deal while the younguns are learning a bit. Ankiel and Ludwick are more “bench bats” and extra outfielder types at this point. McLouth is an interesting “does he really have much to offer” and Beltran jumps off the page at me.

Beltran has a good chance to be 2012′s Lance Berkman. A short term, one or two year deal, that is not financially crippling but allows the team to grab some upside while he proves he is healthy and sets himself up for one more decent payday.

An Opening Day outfield of Holliday/Jay/Beltran that eventually becomes Holliday/Beltran/Craig would be a satisfying lineup to me. Install Daniel Descalso at 2nd and off we go.

Chris Mallonee, Birds on the Bat:

I like all the names Bill threw out except for Ankiel. Maybe that’s just a personal bias, but I feel like he had one great September and has been replacement level or just above since. But I think the Cardinals need to be smart and not try to make a “big splash” post Albert. Get a decent/good bat to absorb some AB’s and provide bench help until Craig gets back.

I think the Cardinals need to keep the flexibility they just gained from Pujols and wait for the big bat via trade or 2013 free agency. Inevitably there will be a spring training or early season injury or non-performing player (see 2011) and the team will need to have flexibility to meet needs that pop up early in the year.

Tom Knuppel, CardinalsGM:

McLouth signed with the Pirates already.

I like Ludwick as a cheap replacement if at all possible. No on Ankiel and I would take Beltran for no more than 2 years.

JE Powell, STL: Fear the Red:

I have to agree with the rest of my fellow bloggers on this one. I think Carlos Beltran is probably the best choice as long as it’s short term. If he can bat .280/20-25/80-85 I think he would be a good bat to have in the line-up. A near-full season of Allen Craig (assuming he can come back from the knee surgery with no lingering effects) and Beltran in the line-up would be a good outfield and I think would be a good replacement bat-wise for He Who Shall Not Be Named (and I don’t mean that snake guy from Harry Potter).

Malcom Pierce, The Redbird Menace:

I won’t break any new ground with my reply. Beltran’s the best option available. He can take over in RF and provide another quality bat to help fill the Pujols-sized hole in the lineup. And it wouldn’t be a terrible idea to see how well he can still handle CF, either.

Anything more than two years is a risk for a guy with his injury history and age, but I wouldn’t mind overpaying in a short-term contract. I’m not sure what else we can do with the money in the current market.

As an aside, I nearly hit my head on the keyboard today when Bernie Miklasz suggested that the Cardinals wouldn’t necessarily promise Beltran a starting job in the OF because of Craig and Jay. Carlos Beltran had a higher OPS than Albert Pujols last year. 219 somewhat overachieving plate appearances from Allen Craig shouldn’t even be a consideration when signing Beltran who, when healthy, is still one of the best hitters in the game.

Matt Philip, Fungoes:

Certainly Beltran makes sense, even if he is currently polling at Fungoes as the Cardinals’ #1 late-season public enemy!

Even playing only 142 games last year, Beltran gained 4.7 WAR (Albert Pujols has 5.1). Fangraphs’ fans project him to be worth at least three wins next year, and that’s estimated at a mere 124 games (that’s more than Jon Jay earned in just about as many plate appearances). He would not be an option to play centerfield, given that he’s only slightly better than Lance Berkman in right field. But he would indeed be the answer to what to do in Craig’s absense and may afford another second-base experiment by Craig when he returns.

If you’re looking for a cheaper option, Michael Cuddyer and Josh Willingham would be better fits. The Cardinals should avoid at all costs Ludwick and Ankiel, both of whom may give some fans some warm feelings, but neither of whom projects to be much more than a replacement-level player (Ludwick had 0.3 WAR last year, Ankiel 1.4)

Bill Ivie, I-70 Baseball:

If I may (and this is not aimed at Pip, just in general), why do we insist that players do not deserve a look based on their stats LAST year?

In 2010, Lance Berkman had a -0.2 WAR, in 2011 for the Cardinals (who took a chance on the guy based on past performance) Berkman posted a 5.2 WAR (that’s 0.2 less than the second coming that just went to Hollywood last season). Albert posted a 5.4 last season, by far the worst of his career, but got a very lucrative contract.

Stats are nie, they tell us how a player performed in the past. Why do we assume they can tell us how a player will perform in the future. If that was the case, we could never say anything about a “chance of scenery.”

Matt Philip, Fungoes:

That’s a good and fair point bill. To give a better shake to Ankiel and Ludwick, both of whom I wrote off using the small-sample size of last year’s stats. I’ll apply a 3-2-1 assessment (weighting last year at 3, two years ago double and three years ago as one).

Beltran: 3.1 average
Ludwick: 1.2
Ankiel: 1.0

Bill Ivie, I-70 Baseball:

Which, if I’m doing the math correctly, Jon Jay and Ludwick are fairly even? Might not be a bad, low cost pickup for a bench bat.

Matt Philip, Fungoes:

I’d put Jay well above Ludwick. Jay has had WARs of 1.4 (in a half season), 2.8 and projects for 2.6 next year.

Malcolm Pierce, The Redbird Menace:

You’re totally right about that Bill. “Last season” stats are sometimes given way too much weight. See especially: the contract Seattle gave Chone Figgins. I only compared Pujols and Beltran last year to ridicule the thought that Beltran should be a part time player anywhere. He’s not a better hitter than Pujols but I think he’s a starter on any team in the majors. Cards fans should be thrilled to see him replace Jay or Craig in the projected lineup as long as the contract is reasonable.

Bob Netherton, On the Outside Corner:

I take the contrarian side of this discussion, not because of the first part of what you said (I do agree with that), but the reasonableness of his contract. Isn’t Scott Boras his agent?

I don’t want to see Beltran for 3 or 4 years in St. Louis and I don’t think he’s worth Lance Berkman money. We’ve already overpaid for Furcal (which I’m OK with), just don’t want to see us force a “name” on the roster. I don’t see him as an upgrade over Craig offensively, and defensively, I don’t think he’s an upgrade over Jay.

Save the money that the Beltran contract will require and pick up somebody of impact at the trade deadline, when more is known.

Pass on Beltran, find another lefty for the bullpen and then let’s get ready for Spring Training.

Bill Ivie, I-70 Baseball:

For what it’s worth, Beltran is represented by Lozano…let that one simmer for a few minutes.

Bob Netherton, On the Outside Corner:

Oh, goodness. That’s right, he switched agents heading into this free agency season. Wow, that would be… awkward.

And what is my take?

First off, I think Carlos Beltran is the absolute wrong fit for the Cardinals. He can’t play center field every day anymore. How do I know this? There doesn’t seem to be a single team that is pursuing him to be a center fielder. Everyone wants him on a corner and he’s even simply average there now.

Second, My choice would be Ryan Ludwick. Ludwick’s best years came in St. Louis and he’s had a couple really bad ones in San Diego. His numbers perked up after his trade to Pittsburgh a little bit. I think he’d make an excellent choice when you’re looking for someone to play for a month and then take a spot on the bench. He’s right handed (which immediately makes him a better choice than a guy like Ankiel) and he can play all three outfield positions. And he’s far cheaper and might be looking for a good year to reclaim some value.

Third, If you were bring Carlos Beltran in to start over Craig in right field, you find yourself blocking Craig for someone whose bat is just as good, but for probably more than 25 times the money. He’s not going to come in here cheap for one year to prove his health. That’s pretty much what he did last year when he established he was still a capable player. Berkman was coming off a horrendous year .248/.368/.413. Beltran is not, .300/.385/.525.

And if you block Craig, you simply find yourself once again in the location of not knowing what he can do. You can’t ask for more out of a player than what he did last year. His 219 plate appearances, if he’d gotten 650 plate appearances at those levels were MVP caliber and he is on par with the best hitters in the National League. He has earned his opportunity to start. I think you can justify bringing Pujols back and sitting Craig behind Pujols and Berkman, but I don’t see how you can justify to Allen Craig bringing in a guy like Beltran on a multi-year deal. If you do that, Craig needs to be dealt and he’s a guy I’d much rather have on my team.

Cardinals finalize arbitration offers

The Cardinals had four arbitration cases to deal with this offseason: Ryan Theriot, Skip Schumaker, Kyle McClellan, and Jason Motte. The Cardinals announced that they have non-tendered Ryan Theriot, agreed with Skip Schumaker on a new two-year contract, and have tendered contracts to Kyle McClellan and Jason Motte.

Theriot, 32, was acquired by the Cardinals last offseason to start at shortstop. However, following a disastrous start to the season, the team explored other options and brought in Rafael Furcal to play the position. Theriot also struggled to rebound with his bat as the team had hoped, putting up a line of .271/.321/.342 with 1 HR and 47 RBI in 132 games for the World Series Champions. He was in his final arbitration year, but will instead immediately become a free agent with a handful of teams already expressing potential interest in his services.

Schumaker, 31, agreed to terms with the Cardinals yesterday on a new two-year contract. The 2 year contract worth a total of $3 million is a good deal for the Cardinals. The former outfielder turned second baseman might be done as a starting player for the Cardinals though, as the team’s GM John Mozeliak has Daniel Descalso penciled in as the starting second baseman. Schumaker rebounded after a tough 2010 to post a line of .288/.333/.351 with 2 HRs and 38 RBI in 117 games.

McClellan, 27, and Motte, 29, were both tendered offers from the Cardinals.

McClellan spent time in both the rotation and the bullpen last season before developing arm fatigue near the end of the season. In 141 2/3 innings for the Cardinals, he posted a 4.19 ERA, making 17 starts and 26 relief appearances.

Motte established his place as the team’s closer down the stretch thanks to a lengthy scoreless inning streak through the summer. He posted a 2.25 ERA in 68 innings for the Cards, along with 9 saves during the season.

So what does “tendered offers” mean? It means that the Cardinals have told them they will be back for 2012 as they are both still under team control. The two sides will continue to talk to see if they can avoid arbitration hearings in February of next season. If not, both sides will determine a value and an arbitrator will determine who has the best value for the player. The Cardinals have rarely gone to arbitration hearings with their players in the DeWitt era, rather coming to an agreement with the players somewhere in between the two numbers.

Pujols to Anaheim. Now what?

I just got back from finishing up my Christmas shopping when I sat down at my desk to see a tweet talking about Pujols and the Angels. It piqued my curiosity and I decided to scroll backwards and see what the root of the talk was. Then I spotted it, Pujols accepting a deal valued in the $240-250 million over 10 year range with the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. My jaw slightly dropped.

For one, I didn’t think any team was going to step up and offer that sort of money. Pujols has been amazing his last 11 years with the St. Louis Cardinals, but over the last three years his numbers have slipped. Many defended his slump this year saying that he was trying to prove himself worthy of a big contract with Alex Rodriguez-type money. But what’s he going to do this next year as he tries to prove himself worth of the contract he got.

Joe Strauss is now reporting that the Angels’ offer is more likely closer to $255 million over 10 years and was comparable with the Marlins’ offer.

The Cardinals’ best offer bounced around quite a bit in the rumor mill. Their initial offer was reportedly the same as the $198 million over 9 year offer that they offered him back in January. Then they reportedly jumped to $220 million over 10 years after the Marlins went to 10 years. But it was later reported that they never officially went to 10 years.

Ultimately, only a few people know what happened in the negotiating room. And we are likely never to find out. But what does this mean to all involved.

For Albert, he turned down legend status in St. Louis for a payday.

I know baseball is a business and players today are always going to chase the money. Except over the last few years Albert convinced the people of St. Louis that he was a man of faith and of integrity. He said winning was more important to him and was willing to put a little bit of money where his mouth was on that if the need came. He consistently put off extension negotiation talks because he was under contract and the team had other priorities. He said that people who think he’s all about the money don’t know him very well. And how does it all add up?

He’ll be wearing an Angels uniform next season because they offered him more money.

It’s not because the Angels are a winning club. I still think the Rangers are a better team with more potential in the AL West. The Athletics could be contenders with the right pieces behind that pitching staff. And the Astros under new GM Jeff Luhnow will join the fray in 2013.

Meanwhile, you walked away from a team that is coming off of a World Series, with all it’s major parts returning, and adding a Cy Young contender to it’s rotation. Obviously it’s not about winning because you have a situation any player would kill for in St. Louis.

Only time will tell what this decision will do to his legacy in St. Louis. He’s still likely to go into the Hall of Fame as a Cardinal, but not only a Cardinal. Will he get the statue at the ballpark? Will he get trotted out in front of the crowds on Opening Days? One thing is for sure, his name won’t be mentioned in the same breath as Stan Musial and Bob Gibson.

He may not regret this decision today, but I think he will at some point wish that he’d never left St. Louis. It’s a better baseball town. It’s a town that would have let him decline without anger out of perspective of what he’s done the last 11 years. It’s a town that would have vehemently defended him against all opposers. It’s a town that would have celebrated his legacy for the rest of his life.

How much is that worth? $30 million?

For the Cardinals, they are a team that is in excellent position to deal with the loss of Albert Pujols. They have Lance Berkman signed for 2012. Once Allen Craig returns from his knee surgery, he will be more than capable in the outfield. They also have the young Matt Adams who has hit up a storm the last two years in the minor leagues who will get a Spring Training invite and probably end up in Memphis, but his chances of making the big league club exponentially increased.

Right now the Cardinals are in position for a team makeover. It’s probably a situation that John Mozeliak has quietly drooled over since he became the Cardinals GM. A chance to make the Cardinals his team, instead of holding onto the successful members of the past. Matt Holliday is the only offensive player signed beyond this season. Chris Carpenter and Adam Wainwright have two more years left. Jaime Garcia is the only pitcher than goes beyond 2013.

The build from within philosophy is now completely dedicated to now that Pujols has left.

Pujols’ departure also opens up some serious payroll room. I am a fan of bringing back Skip Schumaker to play second base. He’s one of the better hitters on the team and made huge strides defensively last year, but it seems if he does come back he will be relegated to a utility role.

They will need to spend on one or two players, but who will it be. Most of your players who are considered top-tier candidates are on the decline of their careers, have been plagued by injury, or both. The best value players have already made their departure from the market.

The team will need to look at a corner outfielder or first baseman and will also need to look at a shortstop. Jimmy Rollins has appeared to be a favorite of the Cardinals’ according to the rumor mill, but I’m still on the fence about him (though I do like him more than Furcal or many of the other options). And a name I heard floated as a potential outfield bat was Ryan Ludwick.

It also frees up some cash for the impending free agency of Adam Wainwright. If I had to choose between Wainwright and Pujols, I’d take Wainwright every day of the week. It’s harder to find an elite pitcher than it is to find an elite hitter, and elite pitchers cost more too.

For me, I’d often thought that it was in the Cardinals’ best interests to let Albert walk if he was going to cost much more than $22 million a year. It seems that Bill DeWitt Jr. and John Mozeliak agreed with me.

I’ll be sad that Albert is gone. I wanted to see him finish his career with the Cardinals. To be the legend that I can turn to my kids and say, “I watched him play his entire career with the Cardinals and he was amazing.” However, I’m a Cardinals fan whether Albert Pujols plays for them or not.

I believe this is a mistake for Albert. I also believe that the Cardinals will be more successful over the next 5 years than the Angels will be.

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Be the GM: My offseason strategy

We all know that question #1 for the Cardinals is whether or not Albert Pujols comes back, and that will be keeping John Mozeliak’s attention for most of the next two months.

I expect it will be a long negotiation while he waits for the market to completely develop. I see Prince Fielder signing first, probably something around 5 year, $115 million (in my opinion in Texas or with the Cubs). Then Pujols will likely return to the Cardinals with about an 8 year, $190 million deal. Yes, I do expect that Pujols will return to the Cardinals next season, and I think it’s just a matter of time.

If I’m the Cardinals, I have Allen Craig penciled in at first and Lance Berkman penciled in in right field should Albert Pujols not sign. My backup plan is in place and all I need to really do now is solidify the holes on the team.

So what do I do if I’m the Cardinals GM and I’m busy twiddling my fingers waiting for Pujols to finally sign on the dotted line?

Solidify the Middle Infield Situation

The first thing I’m thinking about is finding a way to solidify the middle infield. Obviously last season’s decision to trade defense for offense was a bust. The Cardinals were at their best when we were getting good defensive play up the middle in center field, short stop, and second base. The trade for Rafael Furcal really strengthened the defense at short stop. Unfortunately it didn’t help the offense.

If it were up to me, Furcal would not be my first choice to play short stop. His injury history scares me off and his offensive performance leaves me wanting.

I would contact the agent for Clint Barmes. In Houston last year as their starting short stop, Barmes hit .244 with 12 HRs and 39 RBI. He was a +14 runs saved on defense at short stop, compared to Furcal’s +2. Barmes provides just as much pop, just as much bat, but a far better defender who is also two years younger and without the injury history. He made $3.93 million last year and will likely command a raise on top of that. I think something like 3 years, $15 million would get the job done to bring him in and surely he’d rather play for a World Series contender than Houston.

With his ability to play both second and short stop plus defensively, he also provides you some great flexibility if you decide that Ryan Jackson is deserving of an opportunity to play short stop in a couple years.

Next, I’m looking for a second baseman. Somewhere in all of this mess you have to find someone who can legitimately be considered a leadoff hitter for you. While Jon Jay might be able to fit that bill in center field, you want to have someone who can jump into that spot during his slumps. That brings me to my choice at second base, Jamey Carroll.

Carroll,at 37, has basically been a utility guy for most of his career. As a free agent the opportunity to play for a playoff contender could be interesting to him. Last season he hit .290 with a .359 OBP over his 146 games for the Dodgers. He was also a +2 runs saved at second base in 81 games there. Certainly a player that could be capable of leading off when you consider in 33 games as the Dodgers’ leadoff man, Carroll hit .315 with a .389 OBP. He hit .304 with a .388 OBP in 30 games in the second spot in their lineup. Something like 2 years, $4.5 million should get the job done.

That gives you two plus defenders up the middle who aren’t slouches with the bat. Offense and defense should trump the other by itself.

Find a LHP to compliment Rzepczynski in the bullpen

This is the hard one. The list of quality left handed relievers is very thin. Last fall I said the Cardinals should pursue a premier left handed reliever because our organization has been unable to develop one from within yet. You also had 4-5 of them on the market. Unfortunately, the Cardinals went and got Brian Tallet.

While I wouldn’t completely complain if the Cardinals chose to bring back Arthur Rhodes for this role, I’d like to see them invest outside of that option.

The two best that I see on the market are Mike Gonzalez and Darren Oliver, both coming off their seasons from Texas. Gonzalez held left handed relievers to just a .214 batting average while Oliver kept them at just .227. However, both will be pricey options that are liable to cost nearly $4 million a season.

If the team wants to save some money and perhaps have another Dave Duncan reclamation project, you could consider Damaso Marte, who missed the 2011 season after having shoulder surgery in late 2010. Before the surgery in 2010, he held left handed hitters to hitting just .146 with a .200 OBP. He could be a cheaper option as a guy who is trying to prove his health. You might be able to get him for closer to $2 million on a 1 year deal after the Yankees declined his $4 million option.

Find a right handed hitter who can play all 3 outfield positions

Okay, this one might be harder, but it isn’t as expensive. Unless the Cardinals believe that Allen Craig can play center field in roughly 10-15 games this year, I think they need to consider bringing in another outfield for the bench. All the internal options, Jon Jay, Skip Schumaker, Adron Chambers, who are major league ready are left handed hitters. That hurts in a matchup against a tough left handed pitcher.

There was really nobody that I wanted to go after on the market as a good fit. However someone on the CardsClubhouse forum brought up Andruw Jones.

Jones has played just the corner outfield spots the last few years, but he is right handed and showed some bat last year. He hit .247 with a .356 OBP, 13 HR and 33 RBI in 77 games for the Yankees last year while making $2 million.

Jones picked up 222 plate appearances last year for the Yankees. With the Cardinals and Allen Craig likely getting the opportunity to play first and the corners ahead of him, Jones would likely end up with roughly 20 starts and maybe 50 pinch hitting appearances. That’s 130 plate appearances, assuming that everyone stays healthy (which is always a question in itself). Would Jones be happy with that or does he want more playing time?

Beyond those three things, the Cardinals can fill from within pretty well. Daniel Descalso can be the utility infielder with the potential of bringing a guy like Nick Punto back or giving guys like Tyler Greene or Pete Kozma a chance to earn that spot. Tony Cruz can be more than satisfactory as the backup catcher.

Kyle McClellan could be used as trade bait over the offseason. He wants a chance to start and won’t find that in St. Louis. Plus, I think he’s well liked enough that if he went to Mozeliak and said, “Hey, I think I’m good enough to start and I know that won’t happen in St. Louis, I’d like you to explore trading me” that I don’t think it would become as publicized as Colby Rasmus‘ request. Plus, moving him could help the team fill one of the above spots. Beyond that, the bullpen is pretty with plenty of good young arms and more on their way through the system.

Key improvements are all that needs to be made for the Cardinals. They are defending World Series Champions and they have Adam Wainwright returning from Tommy John. Needless to say they should be more than capable of returning, with or without Pujols. If they make some moves like this, I think they could really solidify their position.

What are your priorities in the offseason if you were the GM?

Over the next month and a half, the members of the United Cardinal Bloggers are doing the UCB Round Table where one member a day poses a question to the rest of us and then it gets posted on the person’s blog. If you are interested in checking it out, you can find the schedule and links to the blogs located on the UCB’s website atunitedcardinalbloggers.com.

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